Using Satellite Data to Model Snowmelt

This Digital Elevation Model (DEM) depicts terrain and topography in the region of Wyoming where runoff flows.

This Digital Elevation Model (DEM) depicts terrain and topography in the region of Wyoming where runoff flows.



Team Location: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

Advisors/Mentors: Frederick Policelli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Dimitar Ouzounov, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center – Science Systems Applications, Inc.; John David, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center – SSAI; David Tarboton, Utah State University; Elizabeth Creamer, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center – SSAI; Katie Melocik, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center – SSAI; Maura Tokay, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center – SSAI; Dan Slayback, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center – SSAI; Joe Nigro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center –SSAI; Ben Zaitchik, Johns Hopkins University.

Other Acknowledgements: Scott Cook, Alyssa Mathews, Harpreet Narang.

Abstract: Snowmelt is an important addition to flood modeling in mountainous regions and other areas where snowmelt plays a large role in the overall surface water influx. This project made use of the Utah Energy Balance (UEB) Grid model in order to quantify snowmelt data in near real time. The UEB Grid model is an energy balance model and uses three state variables: water equivalence, energy content, and age of the snowpack surface. The model uses meteorological, climatological, and geospatial data as gridded inputs. This project uses the Goddard Earth Observing System Model V.5 (GEOS-5), and MODIS, TERRA, and TRMM satellite data products. The study area for this project was the Upper Green River Basin watershed. Future plans are to incorporate the UEB Grid model outputs into flood prediction models on a global scale.



Summer VPS > Water Resources and Oceans


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