Validations of Precipitation Inundation Aberrations for African Nations

Project Team: East Africa Health and Air Quality Team
Team Location: International Research Institute for Climate and Society, Palisades, New York


Images created during the validation process of the JPL/CUNY product to the DFO maps, which show the basic methodology behind the process.

Images created during the validation process of the JPL/CUNY product to the DFO maps, which show the basic methodology behind the process.



Authors:
Jerrod Lessel (California State University, Fresno)
Andrew Kruczkiewicz (Columbia University)


Mentors/Advisors:
Dr. Pietro Ceccato (Lead Environmental Monitoring Program, International Research Institute for Climate and Society, The Earth Institute, Columbia University)


Past/Other Contributors:
Alexandra Sweeney (Columbia University)


Abstract:


Recent epidemics of vector-borne diseases (such as leishmaniasis) have caused an estimated 100,000 deaths and have renewed the impetus for defining the ecological boundaries of the vectors. It has previously been demonstrated that climate and environmental factors (i.e., rainfall, temperature, vegetation type and inundation) are reliable predictors for outbreaks of vector-borne diseases. This study will explore the relationship between precipitation and resultant inundation in East Africa (Ethiopia, Kenya and Sudan) through a comparative analysis to verify precision of the City University of New York (CUNY) Surface Water Microwave Product Series (SWaMPS) inundation fraction anomalies against the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) flood maps. In order to explore the potential for forecasting these events, the project will then compare the CUNY/SWaMPS inundation product to heavy rainfall forecasts developed by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent (IFRC). These products along with epidemiological data provided from the World Health Organization (WHO), Juba, Doctors without Borders and the Alaska Sudan Medical Project will give a measurable evaluation for the potential of using water bodies and inundated areas to forecast outbreaks of vector-borne disease. There is potential for developing an Early Warning System (EWS) tool during a second term of the project.


 



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