Call for Papers — Using Crowdsourcing to Further Earth Observation

EarthzineAnnouncements, Crowdsourcing Theme, Original, Sections, Themed Articles

Earthzine.org‰Ûªs ‰ÛÏCitizens and Science: Using Crowdsourcing to Further Earth Observations‰Û theme will explore the technologies, people, and organizations that enable the use of public knowledge and activity to further our understanding of the natural worlds.

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Volunteers Monitor Bird and Beach Health. Image Credit: Paula Sullivan, USGS.

Volunteers Monitor Bird and Beach Health. Image Credit: Paula Sullivan, USGS.

2014 Quarterly Theme Issue 4

Sept. 21-Dec 21, 2014

Earthzine.org‰Ûªs ‰ÛÏCitizens and Science: Using Crowdsourcing to Further Earth Observations‰Û theme will explore the technologies, people, and organizations that enable the use of public knowledge and activity to further our understanding of the natural world.

This theme aims to highlight the ways that crowdsourcing — soliciting the general public or another large group of people to contribute to a given subject — can be applied to Earth Observations (EO) to further our understanding of the natural world.

Specific topics of interest for this theme include:

‰Û¢Crowdsourcing projects and initiatives of government and research agencies

‰Û¢Crowdsourcing use cases, e.g., validation of remotely sense Earth Observations

‰Û¢Citizen science contributions to Earth Observation datasets

‰Û¢Grassroots aerial mapping projects and initiatives

‰Û¢Novel crowdsourcing approaches e.g.. original use of existing social media networks and technology.

Technological developments of the last few decades have radically altered the nature of information sharing and information gathering. These developments create opportunities to involve a new, larger population in the processes of gathering, distributing, and validating Earth Observations. Whether it is a small group of dedicated citizen scientists recording breeding bird locations or anonymous hundreds using social media to validate land cover maps, public contributions can help broaden and clarify key questions in Earth science.

We invite you to submit an article and become part of a growing, professionally diverse community and global readership network working. Submissions must be in English. Submit inquiries and articles to Guest Editors via Managing Editor Jeff Kart, åÊjkart@earthzine.org.

Important dates:åÊSubmissions for the Crowdsourcing Theme will be accepted untilåÊDec. 1, 2014.

Publication:åÊAll accepted contributions willåÊundergo reviewåÊby subject-matter experts, be published online atåÊEarthzine.org, and be freely accessible to the public. Earthzine does not charge authors for publishing.

Please consult ouråÊWriter GuidelinesåÊfor further information.

More Information:

Writer Guidelines:åÊearthzine.org/writers-guidelines

Reviewer Guidelines:åÊearthzine.org/about/reviewer-guidelines/

GEO/GEOSS website:åÊwww.earthobservations.org

Guest Editor:

Carlos GranellåÊ

carlos.granell@uji.es

University Jaume I of CastellÌ_n

Institute foråÊNew Imaging Technologies

Digital Earth and Reference Data Unit

GuestCo- Editor:

Frank Ostermann

f.o.ostermann@utwente.nl

University of Twente

Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC)

Department of Geo-Information Processing

Earthzine:

Editor-in-Chief:

Paul E. Racette

pracette@earthzine.org

Deputy Editor:

Daniel McInerney dmcinerney@earthzine.org

Managing Editor:

Jeff Kart

jkart@earthzine.org

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This yearåÊ marks Audubon‰Ûªs 115th annual Christmas Bird Count. Started in 1900, the number of counts has been steadily growing, creating a valuable body of data and offering opportunities for volunteers to develop their skills and build friendships.