EZ themesEarthzine Themes

Earthzine produces four seasonal themed issues per year. Themed issues are edited by Guest Editors who are experts in the particular topic being featured. Below, find our current, previous and future theme issues and associated articles.

2017 Themes

1st Quarter — Invasive Species
Invasive species are a growing concern around the globe. Tamarisk beetles, zebra mussels, kudzu – how do we use Earth Observations to determine where invasive species are damaging the local ecosystems, and how do we control these species from spreading? This theme will examine the work scientists and researchers are doing to stop invasive species in their tracks.

2nd Quarter — Coral Reefs
The coral reefs are facing threats from multiple sources: rising temperatures and bleaching, pollution, and other human disturbances. This theme explores what is happening to the coral reefs in our oceans and how Earth observations can protect these vital marine ecosystems.

3rd Quarter — Autonomous Vehicle Underwater Observations
It’s a fact that we know more about space than we do about our world’s oceans. Underwater autonomous vehicles are carrying out observation missions to teach us more than we’ve ever known about the seas. For the third quarterly theme we’ll look at how UAVs are expanding our knowledge of the deep.

4th Quarter — 60 Years in Space
The year 2017 marks 60 years since Sputnik first circled Earth in October 1957. This theme honors the accomplishments of those six decades and also looks to the future of out-of-this-world observations. Additionally, this theme explores the satellites that make remote Earth Observations possible.

2017 Monthly Focus

Earthzine seeks contributions to our monthly focus topics. Monthly focus topics complement our in-depth Quarterly Theme coverage, with timely content that highlights developments and news within topical areas.

Articles included within our monthly focus topics are generally 500-1000 words in length and must have a clear alignment with the designated topic. They must be submitted no later than the first week of the month associated with that topic. Contributing to a monthly focus offers a chance for researchers and others working on relevant topics to share their work or observations with an interdisciplinary and global audience.  Our 2017 monthly focus topics and their descriptions are listed below.

If you are interested in contributing, please contact Earthzine Science Editor Kelley Christensen at kjhchristensen@earthzine.org. Further information and guidelines for submitting articles can be found here.

January: Crazy Science
What big ideas in science should we be paying attention to? In this theme we’ll showcase zany ideas that might just be crazy enough to work.

February: Science Fiction and Earth Observation (drafts due Feb. 3)
What do video conferences, earbuds, and waterbeds have in common? They all started as ideas in science fiction novels. In this theme we explore the influence of science fiction on Earth observations.

March: UN International Year of Sustainable Tourism Development (drafts due March 3)
Our hope for this theme is to bring our readers a travel guide of sorts aimed at tourism that makes practice of conserving and sustainably using the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.

April: Earthquakes (drafts due April 7)
In honor of National Earthquake Preparedness Month, this theme will examine how Earth observations help us better understand and predict earthquakes, as well as deal with their effects.

May: Forest migration/tree species (drafts due May 5)
As the climate changes, many species have been observed moving away from the equator toward the poles. This theme explores how even organisms seemingly without mobility — trees — are also shifting their habitats as the Earth warms.

June: Young Innovators (drafts due June 9)
In this theme, we’ll feature profiles of people younger than 40 making waves in Earth Observations.

July: Earth Observations Education Programs (drafts due July 7)
Earthzine is proud to host the Virtual Poster Sessions for NASA DEVELOP and provide the Earthzine Writing Fellowship to aspiring science writers. With this theme we discuss the power of Earth observations education programs to groom the next generation of Earth observations scientists and practitioners.

August: Algal Blooms (drafts due Aug. 4)
Algal blooms are becoming an increasingly pressing topic as fisheries are impacted and drinking water supplies are cut off. This theme looks at how Earth observations are helping us better understand harmful algal blooms and how to mitigate their effects.

September: OES Oceans ‘17 (live coverage provided by Earthzine staff)
This mini-theme will focus on the Oceanic Engineering Society’s conference in Anchorage, Alaska, Sept. 18-22. Earthzine staff will offer coverage of the conference and contributions from conference presenters are also welcome. Click here to browse past coverage of OES Oceans.

October: Earth Observations in Social Media (drafts due Oct. 6)
Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter and the blogosphere are just a few places where Earth observations are impacting a wider audience than the scientific community. In this theme we explore the impacts of Earth observations in social media.

November: GEO (live coverage provided by Earthzine staff)
This mini-theme will focus on the Group on Earth Observations plenary. Earthzine staff will offer coverage of the conference and contributions from conference presenters are also welcome. Click here to browse past coverage of GEO.

December: Essays on Hope (drafts due Dec. 7)
December’s mini-theme features op-ed articles that are retrospective and forward-looking on how we can use Earth information to better our planet and ourselves. From technological advances to community movements, what gives you hope for a better future?

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2016 Quarterly Themes

1st Quarter – Socioeconomic Benefits

SocioeconimicVPS(Sept. 12, 2015-March 21, 2016) — From forecasting extreme events and natural disasters to assessing or projecting ecosystem impacts, Earth observations can help to solve many of the social and economic challenges across the globe.

This theme aims to highlight examples of how Earth observations are used to directly benefit society.

 

 

 

 

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2nd Quarter – Ocean Stewardship 

Oceans photo(April 2016-June 2016) — The ocean ecosystem covers more than 70 percent of our planet. Our understanding of the oceans has huge implications to not only to the future of our species, but to the continued biodiversity of Earth.

This theme will include articles about how Earth observations are being utilized to protect the oceans, their denizens, and their resources. Some story ideas for this theme include an article about the Global Ocean Commission and its efforts to see the ocean given status as a represented U.N. nation; ocean oil seeps; and ocean acidification’s effects on jellyfish.

The final deadline to submit articles to this theme is June 6.
See the Call For Papers here

 

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3rd Quarter – Women In STEM 

Photo by Isabelle Saldana(July 2015-Sept. 2016) — Recent years have seen an increased emphasis on promoting diversity in careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.Earthzine has selected Women in STEM as its 3rd Quarterly theme to acknowledge the critical roles women play in the advancement of earth observation. We seek articles featuring women and their career path and mentoring programs to foster girls and young women in pursuing STEM related careers, associated with all aspects of Earth information.

The final deadline to submit articles to this theme is September 9.
See the Call For Papers here

 

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4th Quarter – Coastal Environments 

coastal-environments-goebel-atlantic-ocean(Oct. 2016-Dec. 2016)  Coastal environments are complex regions of the Earth were the land, oceans and atmosphere interact. Seventy-five percent of cities with populations greater than 10 million are located near the coast; roughly 40% of the world’s population live within 100 km of the coast. Coastal regions are vital to transportation, global industries, food and energy production, and recreation. The interaction of human activity and environmental change is strongest in coastal environments. This theme seeks articles describing contemporary issues behind the science and monitoring of coastal environments including their interaction with human activity.

The final deadline to submit articles to this theme is December 12.
See the Call For Papers here

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2016 Monthly Focus

The south end of Eleuthera Island in the Bahamas shimmers in turquoise waters in this 2002 photo from the International Space Station. Image Credit: NASA.

The south end of Eleuthera Island in the Bahamas shimmers in turquoise waters in this 2002 photo from the International Space Station. Image Credit: NASA.

Earthzine seeks contributions to our monthly focus topics. Monthly focus topics complement our in-depth Quarterly Theme coverage, with timely content that highlights developments and news within topical areas.

Articles included within our monthly focus topics are generally 500-1000 words in length and must have a clear alignment with the designated topic. They must be submitted no later than the first week of the month associated with that topic. Contributing to a monthly focus offers a chance for researchers and others working on relevant topics to share their work or observations with an interdisciplinary and global audience.  Our 2016 monthly focus topics and their descriptions are listed below.

If you are interested in contributing, please contact Earthzine Science Editor Kelley Christensen at kjhchristensen@earthzine.org. Further information and guidelines for submitting articles can be found here.

 

 

January: Earth Observations in 2016
This theme looks at the year ahead to what we can expect from advances in Earth observations and the application of Earth information.

February: Groundwater Mapping and Investigations (Article deadline: Feb. 12)
This mini-theme includes how groundwater mapping and monitoring can be used to inform policy, water law, and decision-making.

March: Weather: Modeling Super Storms (Article deadline: March 8)
The March mini-theme looks with an eye to massive storm events that appear to be increasingly common in occurrence and have growing social impacts. Scope of this theme includes: how weather (and super storms) are modeled and projected; how forecast technologies help individuals, towns, or regions prepare for super storms and prevent damage or loss of life; and how super storms are tracked and monitored.

April: Earth Day (Article deadline: April 4)
In honor of the planet that makes all of our lives possible, Earthzine has chosen April to highlight the celebration of Earth Day. Story topics may include announcements of Earth Day events or celebrations of achievements in using Earth observations for conservation or to expose environmental concerns.

May: Ocean Carbon  (Article deadline: May 9)
Articles are sought that highlight recent advances in understanding the carbon processes in the ocean and approaches to measuring and modeling carbon flux.

June: Water and Human Health (Article deadline: June 6)
This mini-theme will highlight the links between water environments and human health. Articles that can offer analysis or descriptions of results from current projects are especially welcome.

July: Fire Risk Analysis or Tracking Fire Recovery (Article deadline: July 5)
Some research indicates that climate change may lead to an increased frequency of “mega-fires,” placing ecosystems and human developments alike at risk. This mini-theme focuses on what comes before and after such fires. Potential topics include: using satellite data to improve fire risk-analysis, economic impacts of fires, and tracking ecosystem resilience to fire disturbance.

August: Bodies of Water (Article deadline: Aug. 2)
Articles in this theme will focus on bodies of water. From recreation to irrigation, this theme explores how lakes, rivers, freshwater estuaries, and oceans are vital to sustaining life.

September: OES Oceans ’16 (Article deadline: Sept. 6)
This mini-theme will focus on the Oceanic Engineering Society’s conference in Monterey, California. Earthzine staff will offer coverage of the conference and contributions from conference presenters are also welcome.

October: GEO/GEOSS (Article deadline: Oct. 8)
For the October mini-theme, Earthzine will highlight work being conducted by the international Group on Earth Observations. Conducting societally relevant work is important to the GEO/GEOSS community, and this mini-theme will focus on use-case scenarios that demonstrate GEO/GEOSS-associated projects in action. Articles for this theme must have a clear association with GEO or Blue Planet developments.

November: Food Security (Article deadline: Nov. 7)
This theme will focus on how Earth observations are being used to attempt to make food insecurity a thing of the past. Example topics include: ocean productivity, monitoring drought, activities for the Year of the Pulses, and developments that support food security.

December: Essays on Hope (Article deadline: Dec. 7)
December’s mini-theme features op-ed articles that are retrospective and forward-looking on how we can use Earth information to better our planet and ourselves. From technological advances to community movements, what gives you hope for a better future?

 

2015 Themes

 

 

1st Quarter — Indigenous Perspectives on Environmental Change 

"The Dance of Life." Via the Health Culture Society(December 4th, 2015 -March 19, 2015) – We are looking for feature stories, opinion pieces, research articles, news, and more for a special issue devoted to the theme of “Indigenous Perspectives on Environmental Change.” Articles should focus on the theme with such approaches as:

 

 

 

 

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2nd Quarter — Ocean Acidification 

Phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Norway. Image Credit: NASA, MODIS(December 5th, 2014 – March 20, 2015) – Earthzine.org, an IEEE-sponsored online scientific journal, is soliciting articles of 800 to 3,000 words for its second 2015 quarterly theme on Ocean Acidification (OA). We seek contributions from relevant disciplines and all regions of the globe. These can address current and emerging research issues, approaches, techniques or applications; community, state, and/or international initiatives; and other topics related to regional and global science, impacts, adaptation and policy.

 

 

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3rd Quarter Water for Agriculture

WaterForAg(May 17, 2015 –  September 23, 2015) —Earthzine.org is soliciting articles of 800 to 3,000 words for its third 2015 quarterly theme on Water for Agriculture. We seek contributions from relevant disciplines and all regions of the globe. These can address current and emerging research issues, approaches, techniques or applications; community, state, and/or international initiatives; and other topics related to regional and global science, impacts, adaptation and policy. Submissions should include visuals images relevant to the content.

 

 

 

 

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4th Quarter — Socioeconomic Benefits

(SocioeconimicVPSSept. 12, 2015-March 21, 2016) — From forecasting extreme events and natural disasters to assessing or projecting ecosystem impacts, Earth observations can help to solve many of the social and economic challenges across the globe. This theme aims to highlight examples of how Earth observations are used to directly benefit society.

 

2014 Themes

 


1st Quarter
 –  Earth Science Informatics Challenges.  

(Dec. 21, 2013-March 21, 2014) – Earthzine.org, an IEEE-sponsored online scientific journal, is soliciting articles of 800-3,000 words for its first quarter 2014 theme on Earth Science Informatics Challenges. We seek contributions from all regions of the globe, addressing programs and research related to accessing, analyzing, and visualizing very large Earth Science data stores.

 

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2nd Quarter
 – Geospatial Semantic Array Programming.

Pictorial representation of modular Data-Transformation Modelling (D-TM) with Geospatial Semantic Array Programming. Image Credit: Daniele de Rigo.(March 22, 2014-  June 21, 2014) – This theme specifically focuses on the challenge of performing analysis with voluminous Earth science data products that are becoming increasing difficult to migrate to high-productivity computing platforms. The era of “Big Data” has exposed inefficiencies in science research ecosystems in which investigators are attempting to make use of a growing amount of real-time and archived observations, improved computing power that can now be dynamically provisioned, and better tools for cross-disciplinary research.

 

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3rd Quarter –  Oceans Environment and Technologies

red medusa thumb(June 22nd – Sept. 20th) – As a newly adopted publication of the Oceanic Engineering Society, we seek contributions to bolster Earthzine’s coverage of oceans-related activities. Topics may include project developments (especially concerning the European Commission’s Horizon2020, and the equivalent in the U.S. and Asia/Pacific), national or regional achievements, industrial projects with societal impacts, etc.

 

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4th Quarter – Citizens and Science: Using Crowd sourcing to Further Earth Observations

crowdsourcing thumb(Sept. 21- Dec. 21, 2014) – This theme will explore the technologies, people, and organizations that enable the use of public knowledge and activity to further our understanding of the natural world.

 

 

 

 

 

2013 Themes

4th Quarter –  Earth Observation for Health Theme

cfp(Sept. 22, 2013- Jan. 31, 2014) – The theme aims to highlight the relevance and value of Earth Observations (EO) — from satellites, to buoys and land networks — for health and safety. EO examples include: Visible, IR, and Water Vapor satellites, Dual-pol Radars, and Ground-Station Networks for the atmosphere; and Gliders, Pier Stations, and Water Sampling for the oceans.

 

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3rd Quarter
Wildfires Theme

wildfire-150x150(June 21 – Sept. 21, 2013) – The number, size, and severity of harmful wildfires have been rising in recent decades, due to the interplay of environmental and societal changes. This has prompted greater attention and investment to expand human, institutional, and Earth Observation capabilities to better prevent, respond to and minimize detrimental effects of wildfires on life and living conditions.

 

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2nd Quarter –
Applied Science theme

WRSI. Credit: USGS, USAID.(March 20 – June 21, 2013) – These articles will address programs and research related to integrating satellite remote-sensing data and model output into applications and decision-support systems that support global change issues and policy.

 

 

 


 

2012

• 4th QuarterEnvironmental Awareness.
• 3rd Quarter —Atmospheric Chemistry Theme. (Dr. William Stockwell and Dr. Belay Demoz, Guest Editors)
•  2nd Quarter —Forest Resource Information Theme.  (Daniel McInerney, Guest Editor)
• 1st Quarter — Climate Consensus: Steps Towards a Global Understanding of Climate.   (Michael G. Bosilovich, Guest Editor)

2011

• 4th Quarter – Water Availability Theme. (Annett Bartsch, Guest Editor)
• 3rd Quarter – Urban Monitoring Theme. (Paolo Gamba, Guest Editor)
• 2nd Quarter – Extreme Weather Theme (Dr. J. Marshall Shepherd, Guest Editor)
• 1st Quarter – Disaster Management Theme (Sérgio Freire Guest Editor)

2010

• 4th Quarter – Ecosystems (Liane Guild, Guest Editor)
• 3rd Quarter – Global Human Health (Assaf Anyamba, Guest Editor)
• 2nd Quarter – Observing the Oceans (Christoph Waldmann, Guest Editor)
• 1st Quarter – Earth Information Systems/Capacity Building (John Kostelnick, Guest Editor)

2009

• 4th Quarter – Agriculture and Food Availability (Brian Wardlow and Menghestab Haile, Guest Editors)
• 3rd Quarter – Meeting the Millennium Development Goals (Lise Yale and Stephen Andersen, Guest Editors)
• 2nd Quarter – Global Energy Dependency (Paul Racette, Guest Editor)
• 1st Quarter – Disaster Mitigation and Response (John Kostelnick and Christoph Aubrecht, Guest Editors)

2008

• 4th Quarter – Biodiversity – Indicator of Planetary Health (Paul Racette, Guest Editor)
• 3rd Quarter – Hydrological Cycle – Earth’s Circulatory System (Paul Racette, Guest Editor)
•2nd Quarter – International Polar Year (Paul Racette, Guest Editor)
• 1st Quarter – Earth Observation – Global Perspective (Paul Racette, Guest Editor)

Write For Earthzine

We are always open to guest contributors and guest editors for Earthzine. Whether you’re a researcher, educator, student or a member of the larger community, you are invited to take an active role in building Earthzine by contributing an original article or paper. Please visit our Volunteer & Contributors section for more information on getting involved.

 

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