Why the Sumatra earthquake was so severe

An international team of scientists has found evidence suggesting the dehydration of minerals deep below the ocean floor influenced the severity of the Sumatra earthquake, which took place on Dec. 26, 2004.

Regular coral larvae supply from neighboring reefs helps degraded reefs recover

For reefs facing huge challenges, more coral larvae doesn’t necessarily translate to increased rates of coral recovery on degraded reefs

SMOS brings Mediterranean salinity into focus

ESA’s SMOS mission maps variations in soil moisture and salt in the surface waters of the open oceans.

Bacteria living in marine sponge produce toxic compounds found in man-made products

Researchers have discovered for the first time that a common marine sponge hosts bacteria that specialize in the production of toxic compounds nearly identical to man-made fire retardants, a finding that could help scientists better understand the human health implications of these common additives.

An Introduction to My Life Aquatic

Earthzine science writer joins Robert Ballard’s Corps of Exploration on board the E/V Nautilus in August.

XPRIZE to Sponsor Earthzine Writing Fellowship

Applications are due May 1 for an Earthzine Writing Fellowship that will explore the ocean depths.

The genetic basis for timing of reproduction in the Atlantic herring revealed

Animals need to breed at the time of year when their progeny have the best chance of survival.

Taking a Trip? Consider Sustainable Sea Turtle Travel

Ecotourism provides opportunities to experience nature while supporting conservation.

Large Sections of Australia’s Great Reef Are Now Dead, Scientists Find

If most of the world’s coral reefs die, some of the richest and most colorful life in the ocean could be lost, along with huge sums from reef tourism.

The world’s oceans are storing up staggering amounts of heat

The world is getting warmer every year, thanks to climate change — but where exactly most of that heat is going may be a surprise.

Melting temperature of Earth’s mantle depends on water

A joint study between Carnegie and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has determined that the average temperature of Earth’s mantle beneath ocean basins is about 110 degrees Fahrenheit (60 Celsius) higher than previously thought, due to water present in deep minerals.

Call for Papers: Coral Reefs

IEEE Earthzine, an online scientific publication, is soliciting articles of 800 to 3,000 words for its second 2017 quarterly theme, Coral Reefs.