Winner, Honorable Mentions Announced: NASA DEVELOP Spring 2014 Virtual Poster Session

EarthzineDEVELOP Spring 2014, DEVELOP Virtual Poster Session, Original

A grand-prize winner and honorable mentions have been selected for the spring 2014 Virtual Poster Session (VPS) contributed by NASA’s DEVELOP National Program. The contest included 25 projects conducted by 104 participants from around the globe.

A grand-prize winner and honorable mentions have been selected for the spring 2014 Virtual Poster Session (VPS) contributed by NASA’s DEVELOP National Program. The contest included 25 projects conducted by 104 participants from around the globe.

Landsat 8 mosaic images of the Inner Niger Delta in Mali, western Africa. The mosaic seen in the satellite silhouette depicts the extent of flash flooding in September 2013. Image Credit: Chris McKeel, DEVELOP.

Landsat 8 mosaic images of the Inner Niger Delta in Mali, western Africa. The mosaic seen in the satellite silhouette depicts the extent of flash flooding in September 2013. Image Credit: Chris McKeel, DEVELOP.

The grand prize goes to the project, ‰ÛÏReintroduction in Motion: Habitat Modeling for the Scimitar-Horned Oryx,‰Û conducted by a team of four interns at DEVELOP’s node at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

The team used NASA Earth-observing satellite data to create a habitat suitability index to support the reintroduction of the scimitar-horned oryx in Chad. The Chad Ecological Forecasting team’s video maintained ‰ÛÏa good balance between describing the problem and the methods being taken to provide a solution,‰Û said Jennifer Perez, deputy program manager for the Science and Technical Information Program at NASA Langley Research Center, one of 15 in a judging panel.

Each member of the winning team will receive a one-year trial version of ENVI and ArcGIS software, furnished by competition co-sponsors Exelis Visual Information Solutions and Esri. Both companies create geospatial and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software that can incorporate NASA remote-sensing data.

Runner-up honors go to four teams who followed closely behind the Chad Ecological Forecasting team in scoring and led in each of their categories based on content clarity, use of Earth observations, åÊcreativity, dialogue and discussion, and decision support:

‰Û¢åÊOn the Front Lines: A tie for Best in Category ‰ÛÒ ‰ÛÏI Seaweed, Do You? Using Landsat and Open Source GIS to Locate Sargassum‰Û (Stennis Space Center) and ‰ÛÏValidations of Precipitation Inundation Aberrations for African Nations‰Û (International Research Institute for Climate and Society)

‰Û¢åÊAllocation to Inundation: Best in Category ‰ÛÒ ‰ÛÏSmokey Says: Only YOU (and the Sierra DSS) Can Manage Forest Resources‰Û (Ames Research Center)

‰Û¢åÊMitigating Fire and Drought: Best in Category ‰ÛÒ ‰ÛÏThe Hungry Caterpillar ‰ÛÒ Catching Fire: VIIRS Forest Disturbance Detection‰Û (Stennis Space Center)

‰Û¢åÊDefending Agricultural and Natural Resources: Best in Category ‰ÛÒ ‰ÛÏBug Off! Woolly Adelgid Induced Hemlock Decline in the Great Smokey Mountains‰Û (University of Georgia).

For more information about DEVELOP, visit the DEVELOP website.

Previous DEVELOP Earthzine Virtual Poster Sessions are listed in the DEVELOP VPS Archive.

 

Winner

Reintroduction in Motion: Habitat Modeling for the Scimitar-Horned Oryx

Data layers used in the oryx dispersion modeling. Parameters included rainfall, vegetation strength, distance to water, land cover type, and human development.

Drought, civil war and climate change: these issues have riddled Chad for the past few

decades, and the scimitar-horned oryx has been a casualty. But can the oryx be successfully

reintroduced? DEVELOP Goddard collaborated with Sahara Conservation Fund and the

Smithsonian to take a step forward towards ecological restoration.

 

 

Runners Up

I Seaweed, Do You? Using Landsat and Open Source GIS to Locate Sargassum

This Landsat 8 OLI image from Feb. 18, 2014, shows Sargassum and boat wakes located in the Gulf of Mexico. The image to the left shows a calculated NIR/Red band ratio, whereas the image to the right is the LandsatLook ‰ÛÏNatural Color‰Û image that has been preprocessed by USGS.This Landsat 8 OLI image from Feb. 18, 2014, shows Sargassum and boat wakes located in theåÊGulf of Mexico. The image to the left shows a calculated NIR/Red band ratio, whereas theåÊimage to the right is the LandsatLook ‰ÛÏNatural Color‰Û image that has been preprocessed byåÊUSGS.

 

 

 

Validations of Precipitation Inundation Aberrations for African Nations

Images created during the validation process of the JPL/CUNY product to the DFO maps, which show the basic methodology behind the process.

Images created during the validation process of the JPL/CUNY product to the DFO maps, which

show the basic methodology behind the process.

 

 

 

Smokey Says: Only YOU (and the Sierra DSS) Can Manage Forest Resources

The Sierra DSS Viewer will allow users to visualize, layer, and analyze spatial climatic and surface conditions similar to a GIS for the Sierra Nevada.

Imagine the Sierra Nevada by 2100. Snowpack may decline, water availability may decrease,åÊand fire potential may expand. Through the use of the Sierra Nevada Decision-Support System,åÊthe USDA Forest Service can glance at the past, survey the present, and peer into the future toåÊbetter understand how to manage forest resources.

 

 

The Hungry Caterpillar ‰ÛÒ Catching Fire: VIIRS Forest Disturbance Detection

2013 California Rim Fire - MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) pre-fire and VIIRS NDVI post-fire, which clearly shows the affected area.

With the MODIS sensors well past their operational expectancy, replacement sensorsåÊfor MODIS should be considered in order to continue developing forest monitoring andåÊassessment tools. The VIIRS sensor is a suitable candidate for decision support tools, such asåÊForWarn, an online service for satellite-based vegetation change recognition and tracking.

 

 

Bug Off! Woolly Adelgid Induced Hemlock Decline in the Great Smokey Mountains

Thirteen-year spatiotemporal analysis of eastern hemlock defoliation in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

A destructive insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), has been threatening theåÊhemlocks in the Great Smoky Mountains since 2002. NASA Earth Observations were utilized toåÊdetect hemlock defoliation caused by the HWA. For the first time, 13-year trends of hemlockåÊdecline in GRSM were analyzed to illustrate vegetation changes.

 

 

On the Front Lines: Protecting Coastal Communities and Mitigating Disease Outbreaks

Sign in water reads ‰ÛÏHealth Warning: This water may cause ill effects to humans and animals‰Û

I Seaweed, Do You? Using Landsat and Open Source GIS to Locate Sargassum

The Real Monster of Lake Champlain

Pucker up: Kissing Bug Habitat Modeling with NASA Earth Observations

Adeus, Aedes aegypti: Preparing Brazil for Dengue Fever Outbreaks

Validations of Precipitation Inundation Aberrations for African Nations

 

Allocation to Inundation: Addressing Global Water Issues

Aerial view of cliffs on coastline

 

Capturing Colorado’s Floods: A New Method for Extracting Peak Flood Extent

Combating Drought in Atacama, Chile, with NASA Earth Observations

The Pulse of the Mekong: Flood Impact Mapping in Southeast Asia

Smokey Says: Only YOU (and the Sierra DSS) Can Manage Forest Resources

When Disasters Strike, the Force of Remote Sensing Strikes Back

 

Earthly Endeavours: Repairing Ecosystems with Animal and Land Management

Forested hills in Southeast Asia.Image Credit: Xu Xiaoning, Dreamstime.com

Can We Talk About the Elephant in the Park?

Reintroduction in Motion: Habitat Modeling for the Scimitar-Horned Oryx

Monitoring Land Reclamation in Southwest Virginia Coalfield Counties

Finding the Greenest Way: A Sustainable Coexistence between Miami and the Everglades

Marshlands to Rice Fields: Revolutionizing Agricultural Practices in Rwanda

 

Mitigating Fire and Drought: The Swift and Gradual Fates of Foliage

Forest fire

 

A Real Time Fight Against Drought: Practical Solutions for Southeastern Farmers

Oaxaca Drought Patterns: Breaking the Code

Assessment of Water Availability for Agriculture in Bhutan and Nepal

Fire Watch: Determining Fire Susceptibility in the Great Dismal Swamp

The Hungry Caterpillar ‰ÛÒ Catching Fire: VIIRS Forest Disturbance Detection

 

Defending Natural and Agricultural Resources: Fighting Pests and Invasive Species

Pine trees in national park

Bug Off! Woolly Adelgid Induced Hemlock Decline in the Great Smoky Mountains

Preparing for the Future: Linking Technology with Nature to Preserve White Oak

Using Landsat 8 to Mitigate: Mesquite Risk Modeling in Ethiopia

Analysis of Phenocamera Tower Locations in the Missouri River Basin

Forecasting Optimal Growth Zones from the Cascades to the Apple-achians