• The Role of Desalination on a Thirsty Planet

    As global aridification increases, technological advances in desalination can play a crucial role in ensuring access to potable water for billions of people. As Israel’s water program shows, using water wisely and efficiently needs to be part of the solution. Read More +
  • Heavy Weather: JT Reager and Gravity-Based Flood Prediction

    Award-winning NASA scientist J.T. Reager studies water resources using satellites that monitor the Earth’s gravitational field. Read More +
  • A New Kind of Drought: U.S. Record Low Windiness in 2015

    Widespread calming of the wind sapped U.S. wind energy power output in 2015, driven by the same weather patterns responsible for California’s severe drought. Read More +
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Popular Features

  • Call for Papers: Women in STEM

    Earthzine, an IEEE online scientific publication, is soliciting articles of 800 to 3,000 words for its third 2016 quarterly theme, Women in STEM.

    A group of eighth grade girls were invited to participate in events during the annual Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne mentors are pictured observing a trial run of race cars built by the students. Image Credit: George Joch/Argonne National Laboratory

    A group of eighth grade girls were invited to participate in events during the annual Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne mentors are pictured observing a trial run of race cars built by the students. Image Credit: George Joch/Argonne National Laboratory

    2016 Quarterly Theme, Issue 3 July 19-Sept. 21, 2016

    Download the PDF here Earthzine, an IEEE online scientific publication, is soliciting articles of 800 to 3,000 words for its third 2016 quarterly theme. Recent years have seen an increased emphasis on promoting diversity in careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Earthzine has selected Women in STEM as its third quarterly theme to acknowledge the critical roles women play in… Read More +
  • NOAA’s Fifth Ocean Acidification Cruise Sets Sail

    A five-week research cruise along the West Coast of the United States hopes to expand our understanding of ocean acidification and the health of coastal waters.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Ronald H. Brown research vessel. Image Credit: NOAA

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Ronald H. Brown research vessel. Image Credit: NOAA

    Loaded with scientists and gear, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown left the San Diego Naval Base on May 6 for a five-week West Coast Ocean Acidification cruise. The crew will travel from Baja, California, to British Columbia collecting physical and biogeochemical measurements to further an understanding of the complex processes at play in coastal waters as a result of ocean acidification. Once a little-understood process, researchers now know that excess carbon dioxide is absorbed into the ocean creating corrosive waters that affect myriad species and habitats – from the pterapods that many ocean critters eat to the coral reefs that… Read More +
  • A Connected Ocean (ACO) Conference Planned for October in France

    Aco1 ACO 2016 is planned for Oct. 11-13, 2016, in Brest, France. ACO stands for “A Connected Ocean,” and the conference will focus on new approaches, technologies and challenges in relation to ocean processes. The event is endorsed by the IEEE Oceanic Engineering Society (OES) and the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG). AOC 2016 organizers note that the ocean plays a major role in the Earth’s climate, storing heat and carbon dioxide. Human activities put marine ecosystems under growing pressures from ocean acidification and deoxygenation resulting from greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, pollution and fishing. They add that more accurate, complete and integrated ocean observing systems are necessary to build scenarios for the future and better manage our oceans. Five sessions are planned for the conference. You can click on each link below for more information:
  • Could cuts in sulfur from coal and ships help explain the 2015 spurt in Northern Hemisphere temperatures?

    By Daniel S. Cohan, Associate Professor, Rice University Nir Y. Krakauer, Associate Professor, City College of New York James J. Corbett, Professor, University of Delaware Daran Rife, Global Head of Mesoscale Modeling, DNV GL - Renewables Advisory Rui Zhang, Postdoctoral Researcher, Rice University Anna Ruth Halberstadt, Graduate Student, Rice University Leah Y. Parks, Associate Editor, Electricity Policy

    Reductions in cooling sulfate aerosols may have contributed to recent warmth.

    The year 2015 was the warmest in recorded history, and featured an intense El Niño event in the second half of the year. Since global temperatures have been increasing alongside greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations and also correlate with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), both the U.S. National Centers for Environmental Information and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology indicate that El Niño was a major contributor to the 2015 record warmth (NOAA 2016; BoM 2016). We offer a hypothesis for an additional contributor to the record global warmth in 2015: a reduction in sulfur emissions from the combustion of coal and of petroleum-derived ship fuel. Sulfur emissions have been cut in order to reduce the health impacts… Read More +
  • Following the C: A Quick Introduction to Tracking Ocean Carbon

    With the rise in atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon’s role in ocean chemistry and biology is being augmented. New tracking and modeling techniques help to reveal how a changing atmosphere may impact the oceans.

    A simple diagram of the ocean carbon cycle, showing uptake from the atmosphere, longterm storage in deepsea sediments, and release during upwelling. Image Credit: Hannes Grobe, 2016

    A simple diagram of the ocean carbon cycle, showing uptake from the atmosphere, longterm storage in deepsea sediments, and release during upwelling. Image Credit: Hannes Grobe, 2016

    Carbon plays a leading role in ocean chemistry and biology, a role currently augmented by rising atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2). Tracking the rate at which carbon is taken up by the ocean, its ecological impacts, and how it is distributed throughout the oceans will be critical to understanding what these changes mean for ocean health. During the last century, human industrial activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation, and cement production have increased the concentration of CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere by… Read More +
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