GEO Helps Launch Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data

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Global data collaboration has long been a driving goal of the Group on Earth Observations. The recent launch of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data promises to help forward that goal.

GPSDD Logo. Image Credit: GPSDD

GPSDD Logo. Image Credit: GPSDD

Some of the issues are as much social issues as research issues. The GPSDD operates under the conviction that issues such as hunger can be better addressed with better data availability. In the case of hunger, data might be on anything from agricultural modeling to economic data of crop sales and market prices. Examples of such data applications already exist. For example, the Kilimo Trust, which operates in several countries in East Africa, works to reduce poverty and hunger in the region by using market data to inform government officials and agricultural businesses.

Organizers hope the GPSDD will help to foster similar partnerships across research and public organizations, facilitating the translation of data into action. If successful, the network will exemplify GEO‰Ûªs mission to improve coordination and collection of Earth observations for the benefit of mankind. To this end, a Ministerial Declaration will be made at the Twelfth Plenary Session of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO-XII) taking place in Mexico City in November 2015.

With the adoption of Sustainable Development Goals by UN Member States, the Group of Earth Observations (GEO) sees an opportunity to expand the ways in which it continues to support data collaboration in the coming decade. GEO helped launch a Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data (GPSDD) in September.

GEO is one of a number of anchor partners and champions supporting and shaping the GPSDD‰Ûªs vision for a better world through data sharing. åÊThe GPSDD is a global network designed to help promote sustainable development and reduce extreme poverty by improving data accessibility and addressing relevant data gaps. It‰Ûªs a partnership between representatives from governments, non-governmental organizations, the private sector, and civic organizations.

There are 17 Sustainable Development Goals covering a range of social issues, including: Zero Hunger, Peace and Justice Strong Institutions, Climate Action, and Responsible Consumption and Production.

Some of the issues are as much social issues as research issues. The GPSDD operates under the conviction that issues such as hunger can be better addressed with better data availability. In the case of hunger, data might be on anything from agricultural modeling to economic data of crop sales and market prices. Examples of such data applications already exist. For example, the Kilimo Trust, which operates in several countries in East Africa, works to reduce poverty and hunger in the region by using market data to inform government officials and agricultural businesses.

Organizers hope the GPSDD will help to foster similar partnerships across research and public organizations, facilitating the translation of data into action. If successful, the network will exemplify GEO‰Ûªs mission to improve coordination and collection of Earth observations for the benefit of mankind. To this end, a Ministerial Declaration will be made at the Twelfth Plenary SessionåÊ of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO-XII).

(Click here foråÊcoverage ofåÊGEO-XII)